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Web 2.0 Tools for Instructing In-service Teachers on Virtual Schooling in K-12 Educational Settings PROCEEDINGS

, , Wayne State University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Toronto, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-81-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This proposal examines a graduate level course designed to help prepare teachers to support students engaged in online learning at the K-12 level. The course objective is to provide K-12 in-service teachers the foundations and knowledge-base of virtual schooling in the K-12 learning environment. To achieve this objective the course explores and utilizes various Web 2.0 tools to deliver and reinforce the virtual schooling component of the course. Using data collected from students enrolled in a graduate level course in Michigan over three semesters through an action research study, the instructor has been equipped to make informed decisions about the course content, readings, activities, and projects used in further offerings of the course. This proposal describes the course in question, along with the data-based modifications that have been made since 2008.

Citation

Unger, K. & Barbour, M. (2010). Web 2.0 Tools for Instructing In-service Teachers on Virtual Schooling in K-12 Educational Settings. In J. Herrington & C. Montgomerie (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2010--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3939-3947). Toronto, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 21, 2018 from .

Keywords

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