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The Narrative of Computing PROCEEDINGS

, , New York City College of Technology, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Toronto, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-81-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

A mixed-methodology study examined whether using Alice, designed to introduce students to computer programming in a 3D environment, was more effective than using Visual Basic to develop problem-solving skills in first-year college students in an introductory course in computer programming. The study also examined the effect of using Alice on students participating in a learning community. As part of a learning community called “The Narrative of Computing”—which included English Composition, Introduction to Computer Systems, and Problem Solving with Computer Programming—students leveraged the problem solving, programming, and writing skills gained in these three courses to produce videogame prototypes. Each prototype included a sample game world, characters, their interactions with their setting, and a narrative establishing nonlinearity. Results demonstrated that the Alice group showed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase in performance for all questions.

Citation

Lansiquot, R. & Cabo, C. (2010). The Narrative of Computing. In J. Herrington & C. Montgomerie (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2010--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3655-3660). Toronto, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 19, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

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Cited By

  1. Strengthening the Narrative of Computing with Learning Communities

    Reneta Lansiquot & Candido Cabo, New York City College of Technology, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2014 (Jun 23, 2014) pp. 2217–2223

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.