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Learning styles and gender online: The Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Scale (ATTLS) and the Classroom Community Scale (CCS) PROCEEDINGS

, Tokyo Denki University, Japan

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Toronto, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-81-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This paper reports on research into the relationships among learning styles, gender, and sense of class community in an interactive online learning environment. Two psychological scales were selected for correlational examination. Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Scale by Galotti et al. (1999) categorizes individuals with different learning styles as separate knowers or connected knowers (CK), whereas Classroom Community Scale by Rovai (2002) quantifies the success with which learning is fostered in an online classroom community. The study was conducted with university students (n = 190) in a blended design course. Weekly topic-based forum discussions were required throughout the course. The degree of adaptability to interactive online learning decreases in order of the following knower type and gender combinations: female-connected, male-connected, female-separated, and male-separated. This result differs from prior research that found that female learners were likely to be CK and better able to adapt to interactive online learning than males.

Citation

Miyazoe, T. (2010). Learning styles and gender online: The Attitudes Towards Thinking and Learning Scale (ATTLS) and the Classroom Community Scale (CCS). In J. Herrington & C. Montgomerie (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2010--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3413-3422). Toronto, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 21, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

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