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Powerpoints to Podcasts: Students' Use of Web 2.0 in Course Assessments in Higher Education
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, , University of Florida, Gainesville, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Toronto, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-81-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Web 2.0 technologies are being increasingly used by faculty in higher education courses to engage a new generation of students. Course assessments, however, often comprise papers and exams, and course projects end with traditional presentations by students. Responding to survey questions about their preferred presentation formats in face-to-face courses, 90% of undergraduates (n=266) at a large private university stated that they prefer PowerPoint. In open-ended responses students explained that they were not required to use new technologies, may not get extra credit for the amount of work posed by podcasts, videos, blogs or wikis, or were not familiar with the process of creation using these digital technologies. The data highlights the need for integrating Web 2.0 tools into course assignments as well as encouraging undergraduates to create online content to demonstrate learning.

Citation

Kumar, S. & Sessums, C. (2010). Powerpoints to Podcasts: Students' Use of Web 2.0 in Course Assessments in Higher Education. In J. Herrington & C. Montgomerie (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2010--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 2766-2771). Toronto, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

Keywords

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