You are here:

Internet in the pesantren: A tool to promote or continue autonomous learning? PROCEEDINGS

, Monash Unversity, Australia ; , Monash University, Australia ; , Deakin University, Australia

Global Learn, in Penang, Malaysia ISBN 978-1-880094-79-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

Although autonomy in education has already been possible in the past the advent of the internet has made this all the easier. What ultimately results from this, is an increased “desire and curiosity to learn more”. This is partly because internet based learning shifts the ownership of learning onto the learner themselves, making it less of a process and more of an experience. This not only empowers them but makes them realise that they can achieve more by taking their own initiative). One of the biggest challenges that the pesantren or traditional Islamic school, face today is the fact that they are generally are located in remote, rural, areas. Resources are limited and the quality of the teachers varies greatly. The characteristics of a pesantren mean that they could potentially derive great benefit from the incorporation of internet based education.

Citation

Iqbal, M., Barton, G. & Barton, S.M. (2010). Internet in the pesantren: A tool to promote or continue autonomous learning?. In Z. Abas, I. Jung & J. Luca (Eds.), Proceedings of Global Learn Asia Pacific 2010--Global Conference on Learning and Technology (pp. 3754-3760). Penang, Malaysia: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 16, 2018 from .

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Attar, S. (2007). The vital roots of European enlightenment: Ibn Tufayl's influence on modern Western thought. Plymouth: Lexington Books.
  2. Brooke, H., & Solomon, J. (2003). Childrean in an interactive science centre. In J. Solomon (Ed.), Passion to learn: An inquiry into autodidactism. London: Routledge Falmer.
  3. Dancy, R.B. (2005). Learning Through Imitation. Retrieved 21 January, 2010, from http://www.informedfamilylife.org/2005/01/learning_through_imitation.html
  4. Daulan, H.P. (2001). Historisitas dan eksistensi pesantren, sekolah dan madrasah. Yogyakarta: Tiara Wacana Yogya.
  5. Franklin, B. (1958). Autobiography and other writings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
  6. Hasan, N. (1987). Character and function of pesantren. In M. Oepen & W. Karcher (Eds.), The impact of pesantren in education and community development in Indonesia. Jakarta: Indonesian Society for Pesantren and Community Development (P3M).
  7. McGinnis, J., & Reisman, D.C. (2007). Classical Arabic philosophy: An anthology of sources. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing.
  8. Pohl, F. (2007). Islamic education and civil society: Reflections on the pesantren tradition in contemporary Indonesia. In W. Kadi & V. Billeh (Eds.), Islam and education: Myths and truths. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
  9. Post, T.J. (2008). E-learning on tolerant Islam launched. From http://www.thejakartapost.com/node/165707 Quality education for all young people: Challenges, trends, and priorities in Indonesia. (2004). Paper presented at the 47th Internationa Conference on Education.
  10. Scanlon, E. (2003). How does resource-based learning help the self-directed learner? In J. Solomon (Ed.), Passion to learn: An inquiry into autodidactism. London: Routledge Falmer. Solomon, J. (2003a). Theories of learning and the range of autodidactism. In J. Solomon (Ed.), Passion to learn: An inquiry into autodidactism. London: Routledge Falmer. Solomon, J. (2003b). Common features. In J. Solomon (Ed.), Passion to learn: An inquiry into autodidactism. London: Routledge Falmer.
  11. Yumuk, A. (2002). Letting go of control to the learners: The role of the Internet in promoting a more autonomous view of learning in an academic translation course. Educational Research, 44(2), 141-156.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.