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Tasks 2.0: Education Meets Social Computing and Mass Collaboration PROCEEDINGS

, Department of Teacher Education and School Development, University of Oslo, Norway ; , InterMedia, University of Oslo, Norway

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Diego, CA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-78-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

In this paper we argue that for teachers it is becoming increasingly important to develop competence in designing technology mediated and collaborative tasks. The impact from digital technologies challenges the historically stable relationship between textbooks, tasks, and tests. In particular, Web 2.0 technologies and social computing applications that reflect emerging media practices require that schooling addresses collective knowledge advancement and with tasks and assignments that match such practices. Empirically we seek to support our argument by reporting from a longitudinal study of learners and teachers working with different types of tasks in wikis. Theoretically, our research is grounded in Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) where learning is intrinsically linked to social interaction and the use of cultural tools. The findings show that we need to examine the complex relationships between technologies, tasks, activities, and assessment in order to develop teaching using Web 2.0 applications.

Citation

Lund, A. & Rasmussen, I. (2010). Tasks 2.0: Education Meets Social Computing and Mass Collaboration. In D. Gibson & B. Dodge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2010--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 4058-4065). San Diego, CA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. In-Service Training as a Learning Trajectory

    Andreas Lund, Department of Teacher Education and School Research, University of Oslo, Norway

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 1909–1914

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