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Computational Thinking in K-12: Defining the Space PROCEEDINGS

, Education Development Center, United States ; , Missouri Botanical Garden, United States ; , Education, Training, Research (ETR) Associates, United States ; , Sante Fe Institute, United States ; , Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, United States ; , University of California, Santa Cruz, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Diego, CA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-78-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

“Computational thinking is creating and making use of different levels of abstraction to understand and solve problems more effectively; thinking algorithmically; and understanding the consequences of scale” (Carnegie Mellon University Center for Computational Thinking). Many educators simply say that computational thinking means thinking like a computer scientist. What does that mean for youth who have access to sophisticated technology tools and systems in school and during out of school time? Why is this emerging as an important issue in Workforce Education? This paper will help to provide a theoretical framework for defining Computational Thinking and explore what Computational Thinking looks like in the K-12 experience, present the workforce education implication of nurturing Computational Thinking throughout the K-12 experience, and offer examples of assessment strategies designed to measure Computational Thinking among middle school students.

Citation

Malyn-Smith, J., Coulter, B., Denner, J., Lee, I., Stiles, J. & Werner, L. (2010). Computational Thinking in K-12: Defining the Space. In D. Gibson & B. Dodge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2010--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3479-3484). San Diego, CA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 13, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. Computational Thinking and Teacher Education: Are we there yet?

    Betul Czerkawski, University of Arizona, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 75–78

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.