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Web 2.0 in a Preservice Math Methods Course: Teacher Candidates’ Perceptions and Predictions PROCEEDINGS

, Northern Arizona University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Diego, CA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-78-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Web 2.0 tools hold tremendous potential to transform the way we think about teaching and learning, especially in content areas such as mathematics. Though not as easily perceived as tools that could support content development, there are relevant applications of Web 2.0 tools in mathematics and mathematics education. This study investigated the ways in which preservice secondary mathematics teacher candidates thought about and utilized Web 2.0 tools as students in a mathematics methods course and perceived and predicted their uses of Web 2.0 tools as future educators. Results indicate that students grew in their understanding and appreciation of Web 2.0 tools in support of mathematics teaching and learning. Students especially saw value in these tools to promote communication and collaboration. Limitations of Web 2.0 tools in allowing for content-specific tasks like graphing, equation editing and tracking solutions are also discussed.

Citation

Guerrero, S. (2010). Web 2.0 in a Preservice Math Methods Course: Teacher Candidates’ Perceptions and Predictions. In D. Gibson & B. Dodge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2010--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2729-2736). San Diego, CA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

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