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The use of scaffolding for complex learning in Diffusion Simulation Game
PROCEEDINGS

, Indiana University, Instructional Systems Technology department, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Diego, CA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-78-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

According to Merrienboer, Kirschner and Kester(2003), a risk of using learning environment that focuses on authentic tasks is that learners are overwhelmed by complexity of the tasks. As Diffusion Simulation Game(DSG) particularly deals with human change process, player’s cognitive load may increase even higher. To address this problem, I plan to conduct design-based research to identify scaffolding strategies that support managing player’s cognitive load. In this paper, I will first examine how the methods of scaffolding whole-task practice and just-in-time scaffolding work that was suggested by Merrienboer, Clark and Croock(2002) for complex learning. After applying these scaffolding methods to the DSG environment, the feedbacks from the game players and the scaffolder will be collected through thinking-aloud, observation and interview session. Iterative redesign process will enable to propose a scaffolding design model that represents the optimal scaffolding type, timing and amount.

Citation

Kwon, S. (2010). The use of scaffolding for complex learning in Diffusion Simulation Game. In D. Gibson & B. Dodge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2010--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1953-1961). San Diego, CA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 23, 2020 from .

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