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The Process of Learning in a Simulation Strategy Game: Disciplinary Knowledge Construction
PROCEEDINGS

, Drexel University, United States ; , , Michigan State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Diego, CA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-78-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Game-based learning is pervasive in education. There are claims about what students learn and the process by which they learn; however, notable researchers still question what is learned from games. Using a mixed-methods approach, this study examines children playing a commercial-off-the shelf game for disciplinary knowledge and skills gained as well as the process of learning. Children played the game for seven weeks. They were given multiple assessments including a background survey, pre and post assessments for knowledge and motivation, a log sheet to document their progress of play through the game, and interviewed after each playing session. Analysis indicates that two main play strategies were used during the process of learning – explorer or goal seekers. Both player types were able to learn disciplinary knowledge and skills.

Citation

Foster, A., Mishra, P. & Koehler, M. (2010). The Process of Learning in a Simulation Strategy Game: Disciplinary Knowledge Construction. In D. Gibson & B. Dodge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2010--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1903-1910). San Diego, CA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

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