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From Oregon Trail to Peacemaker: Providing a Framework for Effective Integration of Video Games into the Social Studies Classroom PROCEEDINGS

, Ithaca College, United States ; , Wayne State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Diego, CA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-78-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Many have argued the value of using video games in the K-12 classroom, particularly within the discipline of social studies. However, to date there have been little empirical evidence to support these claims. This presentation outlines a framework for the integration of video games into the classroom based on Martin’s (1993) types of video games and Wineburg’s (2001) levels of historical understanding. Through this framework, we believe that social studies educators will have a meaningful structure in which to integrate video games into their classroom teaching.

Citation

Charsky, D. & Barbour, M. (2010). From Oregon Trail to Peacemaker: Providing a Framework for Effective Integration of Video Games into the Social Studies Classroom. In D. Gibson & B. Dodge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2010--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1853-1860). San Diego, CA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 21, 2018 from .

Keywords

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