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The Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program: Teachers developing the next generation of STEM talent ARTICLE

, Education Development Center, Incl, United States ; , , , Education Development Center, Inc., United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 18, Number 2, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This introduction to the JTATE special issue on the National Science Foundation Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) sets the context for the six articles that follow. The ITEST program is designed to discover and disseminate best practices for developing the next generation of STEM talent. Now in its seventh year, ITEST “responds to current concerns and projections about the growing demand for professionals and information technology workers in the U.S. and seeks solutions to help ensure the breadth and depth of the STEM workforce” (National Science Foundation, 2009) by engaging students, teachers, and other educators in compelling, authentic, technology-based STEM activities and learning environments. This introduction summarizes how the six articles describe specific ITEST teacher development projects, provide portraits of these projects, and address important themes that cross ITEST professional development and STEM professional development more generally: building links between informal and formal education; using technology in innovative ways; integrating STEM content into professional development; reaching and engaging underrepresented populations; developing innovative professional development; and tightening the research/practice cycle.

Citation

Parker, C., Malyn-Smith, J., Reynolds-Alpert, S. & Bredin, S. (2010). The Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program: Teachers developing the next generation of STEM talent. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 18(2), 187-201. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved September 23, 2017 from .

Keywords

References

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