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The Electronic Lives of Teens: Negotiating Access, Producing Digital Narratives, and Recovering From Internet Addiction PROCEEDINGS

, , , University of Northern British Columbia, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-76-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Due to the global uptake of technologically mediated communication with its new affordances, the nature of literacy itself is changing. We present a case study of the literacies of Canadian adolescents living in a northern rural context. We found that for each, technologically mediated communication is an integral part of their literacy yet they use computers in quite different ways, aligned with their own interests, values, and social milieu. The teens reported that their digital literacies largely are being developed outside of schools; however, parents had considerable involvement in teens’ home computer use and development of literacies in electronic environments. Key findings relate to negotiation of access, the creation of narratives in digital environments, and the issue of excessive time spent in online environments. A final observation relates to the commercial environment of the Internet and how parents and teens are being constructed as consumers.

Citation

Lapadat, J., Atkinson, M. & Brown, W. (2009). The Electronic Lives of Teens: Negotiating Access, Producing Digital Narratives, and Recovering From Internet Addiction. In T. Bastiaens, J. Dron & C. Xin (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2009--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2807-2816). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 13, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Technologically Mediated Delivery in Higher Education: The Margin as a Site for Change

    Judith Lapadat, University of Northern British Columbia, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2011 (Jun 27, 2011) pp. 796–804

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