You are here:

The affect of type and colour on readability in print and screen based environments PROCEEDINGS

, University of Waikato, New Zealand

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, HI, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-73-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Is black on white the solution for everyone? Text and background colour can have a strong effect on the legibility of type. This research looked at text and background colours to discover which combinations are the most legible in both print and screen-based environments. The experiment conducted tested people’s reading speeds with different combinations of text and background colour over the two media. Sixty-eight participants read a series of passages consisting of different combinations of text and background colour. Subjective data was also collected to gain information on whether the passages people read fastest were perceived to be the easiest to read. Black text on a white background was found to be read the fastest in print and blue text on a white background was found to be read the fastest on screen. Blue text on a white background was overall the easiest to read across the two media.

Citation

Timpany, C. (2009). The affect of type and colour on readability in print and screen based environments. In G. Siemens & C. Fulford (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2009--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 797-806). Honolulu, HI, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 21, 2018 from .

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Behan, K. & Holmes, D. (1990). Understanding Information Technology. 2 ed. Sydney: Prentice Hall of Australia Pty Ltd.
  2. Binns, B. (1989). Better Type. New York: Watson-Guptill Publications.
  3. Bix, L. (2002). The Elements of Text and Message Design and Their Impact on Message Legibility: A Literature Review. Retrieved June 11, 2007, from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JDC/Spring(cid:1)2002/bix.html
  4. Dowding, G. (1995). Finer points in the spacing and arrangement of type. Vancouver, BC: Hartley and Marks Publishers Inc.
  5. Fukuzumi, S., Yamazaki, T., Kamijo, K. & Hayashi, Y. (1998). Physiological and psychological evaluation for visual display colour readability: A visual evoked potential study and a subjective evaluation study. Ergonomics, 23(1), 89-108.
  6. Götz, V. (1998). Color and type for the screen. Switzerland: Rotovision, SA.
  7. Greenfield, J. (2000). Webpage legibility recommendations. Retrieved Mar. 08, 2005, from http://www.miyazakimic.ac.jp/faculty/jgreenfi/WebLegibility.html.
  8. Hall, R.H. & Hanna, P. (2004). The impact of webpage text-background colour combinationson readability, retention, aesthetics and behavioural intention. Behaviour and Information Technology, 23(3), 183-195.
  9. Hill, A.L. (1997). Readability of websites with various foreground/background color combinations, font types and word styles. Retrieved Feb. 17, 2005, from http://hubel.sfasu.edu/research/AHNCUR.html.
  10. Morgan, S. & Morgan, A. (1993). Colour in science. London: Evans Brother Ltd.
  11. Moses, L. (1999). An examination of the interaction of three variables on the readability and appeal of brochures. Retrieved Mar. 08, 2005, from http://hubel.sfau.edu/courseinfo/SL99/brochure.html.
  12. Preston, K., Swankl, H.P. & Tinker, M.A. (1932). The effect of variations in color of print and background on legibility. Journal of General Psychology, 6. Pp. 459-461.
  13. Scharff, L. (2001). Developmental issues in readability. Retrieved Feb. 17, 2005, from Effects of Typeface and Font Size on Legibility for Children (Presented at SWPA 2001) Website: http://hubel.sfasu.edu/research/develread.html.
  14. Volkmann. M.F. (1994). Legible Typography: Some Do’s and Don’t’S. Retrieved Mar. 08, 2005, from http://styleguide.wustl.edu/appendixj.html.
  15. White, J.V. (1990). Colour for the electronic age. New York: Watson Guptill Publications.
  16. Wilkins, A.J., Jeanes, R.J., Pumfrey, P.D., & Laskier, M. (1996). Rate of Reading Test: It ’ s readability and it ’ s validity in the assessment of the effects of coloured overlays. Ophthal. Physiol. Opt, 16(6), 481-497.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.