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The Emergence of Choice in “Multi-Access” Learning Environments: Transferring Locus of Control of Course Access to the Learner PROCEEDINGS

, University of Victoria, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, HI, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-73-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This paper is based on the emerging research program that examines the mixture of various technologies and the role they play in supporting face-to-face, blended, and/or blended online learning environments. With the introduction of video conferencing and sophisticated recording and streaming servers, a model of choice has emerged to represent the role of the learner in designating the type of access to learning environments. This model is being suggested out of necessity as instructors attempt to balance between meeting the needs of on-campus students, remote cohorts who have access to full video conferencing rooms, distance students with common residential bandwidth, or even the isolated learner with access to high bandwidth desktop video conferencing.

Citation

Irvine, V. (2009). The Emergence of Choice in “Multi-Access” Learning Environments: Transferring Locus of Control of Course Access to the Learner. In G. Siemens & C. Fulford (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2009--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 746-752). Honolulu, HI, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 17, 2018 from .

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These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

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Cited By

  1. Blended synchronous learning: Patterns and principles for simultaneously engaging co-located and distributed learners

    Matt Bower & Jacqueline Kenney, Macquarie University; Barney Dalgarno, Charles Sturt University; Gregor E. Kennedy, The University of Melbourne

    ASCILITE - Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Annual Conference 2013 (2013) pp. 92–102

  2. Synchronous Hybrid Learning Environments: Perspectives on Learning, Instruction, and Technology in Unique Educational Contexts

    William Cain, John Bell, Cui Cheng, Sandra Sawaya, Amy Peterson, Brian Arnold & Jon Good, Michigan State University, United States; Valerie Irvine, Richard McCue & Tatiana Little, University of Victoria, Canada

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2015 (Mar 02, 2015) pp. 211–216

  3. Synchronous Hybrid Learning Environments: Perspectives on Learning, Instruction, and Technology in Unique Educational Contexts

    William Cain, John Bell, Cui Cheng, Sandra Sawaya, Amy Peterson, Brian Arnold & Jon Good, Michigan State University, United States; Valerie Irvine, Richard McCue & Tatiana Little, University of Victoria, Canada

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2015 (Mar 02, 2015) pp. 205–210

  4. Patterns and principles for blended synchronous learning: Engaging remote and face-to-face learners in rich-media real-time collaborative activities

    Matt Bower & Jacqueline Kenney, Macquarie University; Barney Dalgarno & Mark Lee, Charles Sturt University; Gregor Kennedy, The University of Melbourne

    Australasian Journal of Educational Technology Vol. 30, No. 3 (Aug 05, 2014)

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.