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Generational Impact: Growing a Teacher Community of Practice in Science Education
PROCEEDINGS

, Hinsdale South High School, United States ; , Homewood-Flossmoor High School, United States ; , University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, United States ; , University of Nebraska, Lincoln, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Teaching can be an isolating endeavor with little opportunity to share best practices or engage in sustained professional community. By way of example, this paper suggests successful strategies for building an authentic community of practice in the sciences that has impact on the professional growth of the teacher as well as benefits the student-learner. As part of a multi-year NSF-funded project, the University of Illinois has gathered evidence to suggest that high school science educators mentoring other science educators creates a necessary trust condition across institutions where problem solving (e.g., how to develop imbedded assessments that measure student understanding of science concepts; creating inquiry-based curriculum within rigid state testing requirements; and how to develop supportive relationships with school administrators) forms the basis for sustained professional growth.

Citation

Camasta, S., Pavinato, R., Comstock, S. & Harnisch, D. (2009). Generational Impact: Growing a Teacher Community of Practice in Science Education. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3722-3728). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 23, 2019 from .

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