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Power of Social Interaction Technologies in Youth Activism and Civic Engagement PROCEEDINGS

, William Paterson University, United States ; , University of Taiwan, Taiwan

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The paper discusses the impact and power of social interaction software and outlines its promising implications for education, creativity and collaboration among its users. Social Interaction Technologies and Collaboration Software have been changing the way we experience our world. From showcasing digital portfolios (secondlife) to posting online reflections and journals (blogspot), co-writing books (wikibooks) to co-producing digital stories (voicethread, footnote), social interaction software is increasingly being used for educational and lifelong learning environments. The usage of social interaction software develops opportunities and supports “Open Learning” practices and processes, and promotes exchanges, connections, and collaboration among people who share common ideas and interests. In our study, we explore the new generations’ participation in the public good, investigate whether they use social networking for social responsibility. K12 students are connected generation for whom social networking is an essential aspect of life.

Citation

Yildiz, M. & Hao, Y. (2009). Power of Social Interaction Technologies in Youth Activism and Civic Engagement. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3049-3059). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 16, 2018 from .

Keywords

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