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The Use and Abuse of Blogging as a Course Activity: Three Perspectives, Three Approaches PROCEEDINGS

, New York City College of Technology, United States ; , New York University, United States ; , New York City Department of Education, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

In much of the same way that the media uses discussions in the blogosphere to gauge public opinion, so too can educators use blogs to gauge student progress. The purpose of this exploratory study was to consider the effectiveness of three types of blogging communities—one-blog-centric, topic-centric, and boundaried—as we reviewed our experiences using all three types in different learning situations. We examine the use of blogging as course activity and highlight successes and failures in K-12 and higher education, including bloggers who are English language learners in Japan. Preliminary recommendations for effective uses of blogs are offered. Despite our different approaches, we reach the same conclusion: blogging as a course activity must be situated within learning communities.

Citation

Lansiquot, R., Rosalia, C. & Howell, A. (2009). The Use and Abuse of Blogging as a Course Activity: Three Perspectives, Three Approaches. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2853-2857). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2017 from .

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