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Emerging Web 2.0 Technologies to Enhance Teaching and Learning in American History Classrooms PROCEEDINGS

, , University of Houston, United States ; , Houston Independent School District, United States ; , Region 4 Education Service Center, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This SITE 2009 proposal is designed to involve conference participants in an exploration of emerging Web 2.0 technologies to enhance teaching and learning in American history classrooms. Presenters will demonstrate a variety of new technologies to develop practical applications such as wikis, Nings, blogs and podcasts. These Web 2.0 applications empower teachers to produce, rather than just consume, technology-based learning activities for their classrooms. Instead of learning HTML code and Web protocols, teachers can create social networks, blogs, and discussion lists simply by completing a form and clicking buttons. This “fill-out-a-form” publishing transforms the Web from “Read” to “Write” and allows anyone with a computer and Internet access to create content. Indeed, one of the characteristics of Web 2.0 is the online communities where users are actively encouraged to use and share content

Citation

McNeil, S., White, C., Angela, M. & Behling, D. (2009). Emerging Web 2.0 Technologies to Enhance Teaching and Learning in American History Classrooms. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2600-2602). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 13, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

  1. Cross, J. (2006). Informal learning: Rediscovering the natural pathways that inspire innovation and performance. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer Pew and American Life Internet Project. (September 16, 2008). Teens, VideoGames and Civics. Retrieved October 17, 2008 from http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/263/report_display.asp

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