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Using Wikis to Build Collaborative Knowing PROCEEDINGS

, University of Minnesota, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Cooperative learning allows groups of students to construct knowledge through social interactions with each other. Previous studies have discussed how computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools have enhanced a group’s collaboration process. Cooperative learning allows groups of students to construct knowledge through social interactions with each other. The recent popularity of collaborative tools like wikis investigates similar research to the field of CSCL. Although CSCL environments have been researched, the use of wikis in cooperative learning groups are now being examined on how they change a group’s collaboration process. This study investigates how wikis can be used as a knowledge management system in a CSCL environment with high school students. Participants were assigned to three groups and assigned specific group roles. Quantitative and qualitative analyses indicated that some students using a wiki participated in a deeper investigation of course content.

Citation

Wojtanowski, S. (2009). Using Wikis to Build Collaborative Knowing. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2198-2201). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 15, 2018 from .

Keywords

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