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Teaching and Learning in the Conceptual Age: Integrating a Sense of Symphony into the Curriculum PROCEEDINGS

, Sacramento State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Pink (2006) believes that we are moving into a conceptual age and this means the requirements for a desirable employee have changed, placing more value on whole brain thinkers. If this is the case, the next step is applying right brain-directed practices in the educational system. Pink identifies six senses that make up whole brain thinkers. They are design, story, meaning, empathy, play and symphony. This paper discusses Symphony, which is the ability to see various elements as a whole. Symphony is an important aspect of developing the skills that draw upon both the right and left side of the brain.

Citation

Futrell-Schilling, D. (2009). Teaching and Learning in the Conceptual Age: Integrating a Sense of Symphony into the Curriculum. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1832-1837). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 16, 2018 from .

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