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How scientific inquiry emerges from game design PROCEEDINGS

, , , George Mason University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

With 200 students in a Saturday and summer game design program, we focus on how scientific inquiry emerges from students designing game components using 3-D modeling and animation. We argue that the game design process has particular pedagogical strengths: 1) it encourages scientific inquiry and understanding of physical laws in a non-science domain 2) the problems are open-ended, each student’s design is different lessening the chance there will be rote imputation of solutions and instead promotes productive collaborations 3) the immediate visual feedback from failed simulations confronts students with the differences between their intuitive theories of physical laws and the formal laws they need to apply, and from the results of their experiences, 4) the simulated world allows students to design situations with impossible, improbable or extreme conditions. We discuss how these combined elements have the potential to engage students in game design and meaningful scientific inquiry.

Citation

Sheridan, K., Clark, K.C. & Peters, E. (2009). How scientific inquiry emerges from game design. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1555-1563). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 20, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Integrating Science Content into Video Game Design

    Neda Khalili & Asia Williams, George Mason University, United States; Melanie Stegman, Federation of American Scientists, United States; Kevin Clark & Kimberly Sheridan, George Mason University, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2010 (Jun 29, 2010) pp. 2760–2764

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