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Testing An Assumption of the Potential of Homemade PowerPoint Games PROCEEDINGS

, Wayne State University, Canada ; , hkromrei@gmail.com, United States ; , , , Wayne State University, United States ; , Oxford University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Proponents of homemade PowerPoint games claim that students can gain a deeper understanding of the content based upon the act of constructing the game, writing a compelling narrative, and creating higher order questions or problems. However, results of recent studies into the effectiveness of homemade PowerPoint games have yielded no significant difference. The purpose of this study was to test the assumption that students are creating higher order questions by examining the games from one of these recent studies. Our results indicate that students are largely creating recall-style questions. As such, we recommend that homemade PowerPoint game proponents improve the instructional aids related to question writing within their project.

Citation

Barbour, M., Kromrei, H., McLaren, A., Toker, S., Mani, N. & Wilson, V. (2009). Testing An Assumption of the Potential of Homemade PowerPoint Games. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1381-1387). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 21, 2018 from .