You are here:

An Evaluation of Web 2.0 Pedagogy: Student-authored Wikibook vs Traditional Textbook PROCEEDINGS

, Old Dominion University, United States ; , Harvard, United States ; , , , , Old Dominion University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Rather than using a traditional text, students in an educational foundations course write their own text using Wikibooks. The notion of student-generated textbooks calls into question many issues of credibility, traditional definitions of expertise, and the future of textbooks generally. This study examines the effectiveness of this new Web 2.0 pedagogy by examining academic outcomes over two semesters. Students that used a traditional text were compared to those who wrote their own course Wikibook. Initial findings suggest that students who generated their own text learned the overall course content as well as students who used a traditional text, and demonstrated greater mastery of the content from their course text.

Citation

Kidd, J., O'Shea, P., Kaufman, J., Baker, P., Hall, T. & Allen, D. (2009). An Evaluation of Web 2.0 Pedagogy: Student-authored Wikibook vs Traditional Textbook. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 917-919). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Crawford, K. (2003). The role and purpose of textbooks. International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research, 3(2), 5–11.
  2. Dede, C. (2008) A seismic shift in epistemology. EDUCAUSE Review 43(3), 80-81.
  3. Inglis, F. (1985). The management of ignorance: A political theory of curriculum. New York: Basil Blackwell.
  4. Rainie, L. (2007). Wikipedia: When in doubt, multitudes seek it out. (Pew Internet& American Life Project). Pew Research Center: Washington, D.C. Accessed online on October 12, 2007 from http://pewresearch.org/pubs/460/wikipedia Reys B.J., Reys R.E. & Chavez, O. (2004). Why mathematics textbooks matter. Educational Leadership 61(5), 6166.
  5. Rotfeld, H.J. (2000). The textbook effect: Conventional wisdom, myth, and error in marketing. Journal of Marketing (April) 64, 122-127.
  6. Stiggins, R.J. (2005). Student-involved assessment for learning– 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc.
  7. Williams, R. (1989) Hegemony and the selective tradition, in: S. DeCastell et al. (Eds) Language, Authority and Criticism: Readings on the School Textbook, pp. 56–61 (London: The Falmer Press).
  8. Yager, R.E. & Akcay, H. (2008). Comparison of student learning outcomes in middle school science classes with an STS approach and atypical textbook dominated approach. Research in Middle Level Education Online, 31(7)

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.