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Challenging Teachers’ Preconceptions, Misconceptions, and Concerns of Virtual Schooling PROCEEDINGS

, , Wayne State University, Canada

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This study examined the perceptions of graduate students in an instructional technology course related to K-12 online learning based upon their completion of the Teacher Education Goes into Virtual Schooling (TEGIVS) curriculum. The TEGIVS program was created through a grant funded initiative at Iowa State University. Nine graduate students at a large, state-funded, mid-Western university completed this curriculum as a part of their Internet in the Classroom course. Based upon our initial analysis, the TEGIVS curriculum was effective for providing these graduate students with some experience with how K-12 online learning opportunities are delivered, along with some of the possibilities and challenges associated with these opportunities. The analysis of this data is continuing, and there are plans to continue this line of inquiry with additional students in future offerings of this course.

Citation

Barbour, M. & Unger, K. (2009). Challenging Teachers’ Preconceptions, Misconceptions, and Concerns of Virtual Schooling. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 785-790). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 21, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Web 2.0 Tools for Instructing In-service Teachers on Virtual Schooling in K-12 Educational Settings

    Kelly Unger & Michael Barbour, Wayne State University, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2010 (Jun 29, 2010) pp. 3939–3947

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