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Educational Blogging: Going Beyond Reporting, Journaling, and Commenting to Make Connections and Support Critical Thinking PROCEEDINGS

, Salisbury University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The use of blogs as an instructional tool is growing. Teachers are using blogs to create class portals and to provide students a space to post comments and reflections online. Some educators question the use of student blogs in the classroom stating that the requirement to publish academic work online for course assignments contradicts the free flow spirit of authenticy and engagement. They claim that when students are required to comment and connect, the exercise can become contrived and superficial. This study explores a strategy for using blogs for course assignments that supports the development of meaningful connections. Requiring students to post based on readings of their peers and experts can lead to greater understanding of course content. Guiding students to incorporate comments within their posts rather than requiring students to comment on peer’s blogs on disparate topics can lead to greater understanding and meaningful connection of thought.

Citation

Royer, R. (2009). Educational Blogging: Going Beyond Reporting, Journaling, and Commenting to Make Connections and Support Critical Thinking. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 507-514). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 13, 2018 from .

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