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Make It a Two-Way connection: A Response to “Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media” Article

, University of Vermont, United States

CITE Journal Volume 8, Number 4, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

The recent editorial “Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media” (Bull, Thompson, Searson, Garofalo, Park, Young, & Lee 2008) points out that social media exemplified in Web sites such as YouTube, Facebook and Wikipedia are built on the “cognitive surplus” and social networking of participants. Unfortunately, as the authors point out, formal educational environments pose barriers to their use. The hallmarks of the new technology—active creation of personalized online content and fluid communication networks—don’t fit well with authoritative control of learning objectives, lack of time, limited access to technology, and the general low level of effective use of technology in schools.

Citation

Gibson, D. (2008). Make It a Two-Way connection: A Response to “Connecting Informal and Formal Learning Experiences in the Age of Participatory Media”. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 8(4), 305-309. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

Keywords

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These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

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Cited By

  1. ICT in Teaching and Learning: Report from the Working groups on ICT and the teacher/learner perspective

    Alona Forkosh-Baruch, Tel-Aviv University and Levinsky College of Education – Israel, Israel

    ICT in Teaching and Learning: Report from the Working groups on ICT and the teacher/learner perspective (2009) pp. 1–10

  2. Urban Youth and Social Media: Implications for Informal and Formal Educational Spaces

    Terry Kidd, Texas A&M University, United States; B. Stephen Carpenter, II, Pennsylvania State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012 (Mar 05, 2012) pp. 1537–1545

  3. Game Changers for Teacher Education

    David Gibson, Arizona State University, United States; Gerald Knezek, University of North Texas, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 929–942

  4. My Great State: Using the Adventure Learning Framework and Participatory Media to Build Community while Bridging Informal and Formal Learning

    Jeni Henrickson & Suzan Koseoglu, University of Minnesota, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2009 (Oct 26, 2009) pp. 1648–1653

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.