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Supporting Deep Approaches to Learning through the Use of Wikis and Weblogs PROCEEDINGS

, Mount Royal College, Canada

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-64-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

There is increasing use of wikis and weblogs in formal educational contexts (Higdon, 2005). This study focused on documenting their impact on student approaches to learning. Students in an undergraduate education course used wikis to collaboratively summarize online discussion forum sessions and weblogs for self-reflection and peer review of course assignments. Survey and focus group results indicate students perceive that these digital tools can support deep approaches to learning only when the teaching approaches and assessment framework for a course are intentionally designed to promote peer collaboration and reflection.

Citation

Vaughan, N. (2008). Supporting Deep Approaches to Learning through the Use of Wikis and Weblogs. In K. McFerrin, R. Weber, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2008--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2857-2864). Las Vegas, Nevada, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 16, 2018 from .

Keywords

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