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Comparing Student Interactions in Second Life and Face-to-Face Role-playing Activities
PROCEEDINGS

, , , Michigan State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-64-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This study compared student performances in role-playing activities in both face-to-face environment and Second Life. It was found that students produced similar amount of communication in the two environments, but the communication styles were different. In SL role-playing activities, students tended to take more turns, and have shorter exchanges in each turn-taking than in FTF environment. Students also tended to generate more concept-related dialogues in SL, though they may not be as elaborated as those in FTF environments. The educational implications for this study were discussed.

Citation

Gao, F., Noh, J.M. & Koehler, M.J. (2008). Comparing Student Interactions in Second Life and Face-to-Face Role-playing Activities. In K. McFerrin, R. Weber, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2008--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2033-2035). Las Vegas, Nevada, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

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These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

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Cited By

  1. Facilitating Collaboration When Teaching in a Multi-User Virtual Environment

    Barbara Ludlow & Melissa Hartley, West Virginia University, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014 (Oct 27, 2014) pp. 1226–1231

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.