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Game and flow concepts for learning: some considerations PROCEEDINGS

, University of Montreal, Canada

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-64-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Games are often described as one of the most representative activity that can generate flow experiences. They are also said to be not only an experience machine but also a learning one. So exciting avenues arise when one considers how teachers could benefit from these key concepts to optimize the learning experience in a traditional classroom or more effectively in an e-learning setting. The objective of this paper is to present fundamental thoughts about how Csikszentmihalyi's flow model and game concepts can lead to more effective and satisfactory course developments.

Citation

Lemay, P. (2008). Game and flow concepts for learning: some considerations. In K. McFerrin, R. Weber, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2008--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 510-515). Las Vegas, Nevada, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

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