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Copyright and Distance Education: The Impact of the Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act
Article

, Arcadia University, United States

AACE Journal Volume 17, Number 2, ISSN 1065-6901 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Copyright in the United States can be traced back to the U.S. Constitution in 1787. To encourage authorship of creative works, Congress created a limited monopoly in §106 of the Copyright Act of 1790. To balance this monopoly, Congress drafted §107 which provides public access to creative works through fair use. Revisions were necessary due to new information technologies. However, these revisions created an imbalance between traditional and distance education classrooms. In 2002, this imbalance was addressed through the Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act (TEACH). In an effort to make copyright law friendlier towards internet-based distance education, Congress modified §110(2), performances and displays, and §112(f), digitization of analog materials. Discussion of the TEACH Act and compliance recommendations for first-time online instructors are addressed.

Citation

Nelson, E. (2009). Copyright and Distance Education: The Impact of the Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act. AACE Journal, 17(2), 83-101. Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 21, 2019 from .

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