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Integrating Social Software into Course Design and Tracking Student Engagement: Early Results and Research Perspectives
PROCEEDINGS

, Brunel University / Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College, United Kingdom ; , , Buckinghamshire Chilterns University College, United Kingdom

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Quebec City, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-63-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The uptake of social software is becoming more widespread in many sectors of education and organizational development. However, there is little empirical research on the impacts of adopting these technologies, and so it is difficult to determine appropriate pedagogic models and whether or not the desired learning outcomes are being realized. This paper reports early findings of an ongoing pilot study which is based on the concept of collaborative learning and supported by means of social software. It describes the educational philosophy behind the study and the teaching techniques used. The application of various features of social software, including blogs, file management and personalization, are discussed, as well as the different techniques for facilitating and measuring the level of student engagement with social software. The results indicate that student engagement with social software can be shaped by course design and activities that integrate educational technology into the course structure.

Citation

Stepanyan, K., Mather, R. & Payne, J. (2007). Integrating Social Software into Course Design and Tracking Student Engagement: Early Results and Research Perspectives. In T. Bastiaens & S. Carliner (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2007--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 7386-7395). Quebec City, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 22, 2019 from .

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