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Using Social Networking Concepts to Improve Student-to-student Collaboration in Online Courses
PROCEEDINGS

, Eastern Illinois University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Quebec City, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-63-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Network theory tells us that a network with 10 nodes has 90 connections while a network with 15 nodes has 210. A 50% increase in nodes represents a 233% increase in connections! This power can be leveraged using some simple and available technologies as we create such networks (learning communities) in our online classrooms. If we implement specific teaching strategies designed to build and strengthen the connections in that network, the students can have a richer, broader-based learning experience. In this presentation we will examine the idea of classroom social networks and offer some suggestions for implementing a small learning community network among your students using freely available techniques and interactive technologies, including RSS feeds, blogs, wikis, and forums. These techniques are useful both in traditional and online courses and they serve to establish stronger connections between students and offer them a greater variety of learning style and content sourcing.

Citation

Garrett, N. (2007). Using Social Networking Concepts to Improve Student-to-student Collaboration in Online Courses. In T. Bastiaens & S. Carliner (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2007--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1542-1546). Quebec City, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 16, 2019 from .

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