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What We Know About the Impacts of WebQuests: A Review of Research
Article

, Miami University, United States ; , University of Northern Iowa, United States

AACE Journal Volume 16, Number 4, ISSN 1065-6901 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This article examines the body of research investigating the impacts of the WebQuest instructional strategy on teaching and learning. The WebQuest instructional strategy is often praised as an inquiry-oriented activity, which effectively integrates technology into teaching and learning. The results of research suggest that while this strategy may have a positive impact on collaborative working skills and learner attitudes, there is little direct impact or advantage for increasing student achievement when compared with other instructional activities. Included in this article is a discussion of the notable research studies that have investigated the WebQuest strategy as well as a discussion of the implications and future direction for web-based inquiry projects.

Citation

Abbitt, J. & Ophus, J. (2008). What We Know About the Impacts of WebQuests: A Review of Research. AACE Journal, 16(4), 441-456. Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 23, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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