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Design-based research and doctoral students: Guidelines for preparing a dissertation proposal
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Wollongong, Australia ; , University of Twente, Netherlands ; , University of Georgia, United States ; , Edith Cowan University, Australia

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-62-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

At first glance, design-based research may appear to be such a long-term and intensive approach to educational inquiry that doctoral students, most of whom expect to complete their Ph.D. degree in 4-5 years, should not attempt to adopt this approach for their doctoral dissertations. In this paper, we argue that design-based research is feasible for doctoral students, and that candidates should be encouraged to engage in it. More specifically, we describe the components of a dissertation proposal or prospectus that utilizes design-based research methods in the context of educational technology research.

Citation

Herrington, J., McKenney, S., Reeves, T. & Oliver, R. (2007). Design-based research and doctoral students: Guidelines for preparing a dissertation proposal. In C. Montgomerie & J. Seale (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2007--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 4089-4097). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 24, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Technology as a creative partner: Unlocking learner potential and learning

    Vickel Narayan, AUT University, New Zealand

    ASCILITE - Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Annual Conference 2013 (2013) pp. 612–621

  2. Design-based research: Implementation issues in emerging scholar research

    Jan Herrington, Murdoch University, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2012 (Jun 26, 2012) pp. 1–6

  3. Indigenous Sharing, Collaboration and Synchronous Learning

    Michelle Eady, Irina Verenikina & Caroline Jones, University of Wollongong, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2010 (Jun 29, 2010) pp. 960–969

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.