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Learning in a Virtual World, Part 2 PROCEEDINGS

, The University of Texas at San Antonio, United States ; , Arizona State University, United States ; , The University of British Columbia, Canada ; , Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, China ; , The University of British Columbia, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-62-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Virtual learning environments (VLE) are not new to higher education but are currently gaining much attention in both the popular and academic press. Historically VLEs have been heavy on engagement but weak in user interface and usability. Commercial development of Virtual Worlds has surpassed developments in VLEs. Most recently there has been a trend toward 3D virtual worlds in which participants (or inhabitants) move and interact within a complex and constructed environment. Many virtual worlds offer compelling UI and interactive functions that engage and even absorb the frequent or casual visitor. This symposium explores themes that have emerged from the use and discussion about the use of the Virtual World Second Life as a VLE.

Citation

McGee, P., Carmean, C., Rauch, U., Noakes, N. & Lomas, C. (2007). Learning in a Virtual World, Part 2. In C. Montgomerie & J. Seale (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2007--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3681-3685). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

Keywords

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