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Emergent Features and Reciprocal Innovation in Modding Communities
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, E-Learning Design Lab, University of Kansas, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-62-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The participatory design and modification, or modding, of commercial video games has become increasingly common due to the growing power and versatility of home hardware and software. Several studies have shown the academic benefits of modding, but no current studies have examined which features of a video game may be modified to increase the educational value of a commercial product. This paper examines and defines emergent features, the tendency of modders to inject aspects of themselves in the game, to advertise their outside interests, and to increase the historical value of the game by dramatically altering previously unimportant game features. The production process for emergent features tends to generate multiple, equally viable user-modifications which often serve mutually exclusive purposes. The paper concludes with the educational implications of reciprocal innovation.

Citation

Moshirnia, A. (2007). Emergent Features and Reciprocal Innovation in Modding Communities. In C. Montgomerie & J. Seale (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2007--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1684-1689). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 20, 2019 from .

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