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"Look, it's turning!" Factors Affecting Structural and Functional Knowledge Acquistion in an Elementary School Robotics Classroom PROCEEDINGS

, , , , , , , , Teachers College, Columbia University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-62-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The paper presents a study investigating how novices make transitions in understanding and developing appropriate mental models of robotics systems. In the course of a 9-week, after-school robotics club, 13 third and fourth grade students had the opportunity to view, construct, and program robots using Lego robotics. Students' drawings and videotaped responses to discussion questions were used to assess their knowledge of robotics. By comparing students' work from various sessions throughout the course, it was possible to recognize improvements in structural and functional knowledge among students who were highly engaged in programming. Evidence suggested that the process of programming facilitated the integration of various forms of knowledge -imagistic, declarative, and procedural – into working mental models, better enabling these students to design realistic robots, and make analyses and predictions of robot behavior. These findings provide insight into methods for guiding and assessing student development in the robot building process.

Citation

Chan, M., Black, J., Han, I.S., Vitale, J., Xia, Q., Subramanian, M., Du, M. & Kang, S. (2007). "Look, it's turning!" Factors Affecting Structural and Functional Knowledge Acquistion in an Elementary School Robotics Classroom. In C. Montgomerie & J. Seale (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2007--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1626-1631). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 17, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. An Embodied Approach to the Instruction of Conditional Logic in Video Game Programming

    Cameron L. Fadjo, Chun-Hao Chang, JeeHye Hong & John B. Black, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2010 (Jun 29, 2010) pp. 2672–2679

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.