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The Effects of Different Voices in Computer-Based Instruction on Children’s Learning
Article

, , , Waterford Research Institute, United States

Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Volume 17, Number 4, ISSN 1055-8896 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

** Invited as a paper from ED-MEDIA 2006 ** Educational software for preliterate children requires audio instruction. To better understand the effect that different voices, adult versus child and male versus female, may have on a child's ability to learn, the study authors tested 104 preschool and kindergarten aged children on a lesson about patterns. Each child received the lesson with only one type of voice: adult male, adult female, child, and cartoon character. Performance on pre- and posttests were then compared to determine the effect of the different types of voices. The results suggest there may be some impact on learning, depending on the child's background. Children from the first test site showed significantly greater gains when listening to the adult male voice over the cartoon voice, in spite of their preference for the cartoon voice. However, children from the second test site, which differed in socioeconomic status and previous software exposure, showed no significant differences in gain scores between voices.

Citation

Shamir, H., Hercules, K. & Crowther, M. (2008). The Effects of Different Voices in Computer-Based Instruction on Children’s Learning. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 17(4), 581-595. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 28, 2023 from .

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