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Special Education Methods Coursework: Information Literacy for Teachers through the Implementation of Graphic Novels PROCEEDINGS

, Monmouth University, United States ; , University of Houston - Clear Lake, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Antonio, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-61-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Within special education methods courses, the modeling of visual instructional tools, or visual training tools, to create a new presentation of information to provide the learning support necessary for students in today's inclusive classrooms is of utmost importance. This skill, information literacy, the presentation of information using a creative, alternative approach, is critical for teacher candidates who must be able to translate the knowledge into innovative learning contexts for students with diverse learning needs (i.e., disabilities, at-risk, second language). The development of graphic novels and related genre through the implementation of instructional design and communications technological theories is addressed in this paper as well as a discussion of real-world learning applications for teacher education

Citation

Martin, S.S. & Crawford, C.M. (2007). Special Education Methods Coursework: Information Literacy for Teachers through the Implementation of Graphic Novels. In R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2007--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1313-1318). San Antonio, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

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