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Authentic E-Learning in Higher Education: Design Principles for Authentic Learning Environments and Tasks PROCEEDINGS

, University of Wollongong, Australia

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-60-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

With many learners failing to engage with didactic and outmoded instructional methods, and unwilling to use technology that simply replicates the one-way transfer of information from teacher to student, authentic learning designs have the potential to improve student engagement and educational outcomes. This paper argues that online technologies afford the design and
creation of truly innovative authentic learning environments. The theoretical
foundations of this approach are strong, and they are also explored, together with
discussion of the importance of tasks as the focus of authentic activities. Finally,
the case is made for a more comprehensive approach to investigating the effectiveness of authentic learning environments through design-based research.

Citation

Herrington, J. (2006). Authentic E-Learning in Higher Education: Design Principles for Authentic Learning Environments and Tasks. In T. Reeves & S. Yamashita (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2006--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 3164-3173). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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