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Technology Options for Assessment Purposes and Quality Graduate Outcomes PROCEEDINGS

, , RMIT University, Australia

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Orlando, FL USA ISBN 978-1-880094-60-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

With greater student diversity and large numbers in classes, difficulties occur in ensuring quality across course deliveries at various campuses, and comparing standards set. Not only is this true for the delivery of content, or access to resources, but also for the assessments, grades assigned and prizes awarded. Many options exist for assessing student graduate capabilities for online or distance courses and programs. We propose ways to address issues surrounding authentication and other hurdles posed by various technological options for assessment. In particular in this paper, we focus on the assessment required for an online postgraduate diploma in web development.

Citation

Hamilton, M. & Howell, S. (2006). Technology Options for Assessment Purposes and Quality Graduate Outcomes. In E. Pearson & P. Bohman (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2006--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 904-911). Orlando, FL USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

Keywords

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