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Interactive Middle School Courseware on Abstract Reasoning Skills
PROCEEDINGS

, , , University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States ; , Prairie City Computing, Inc, United States ; , University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Orlando, Florida, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-58-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Quantitative reasoning skills are a fundamental tool in many fields, ranging from Mathematics to Engineering and from Business to Rhetoric. However, quantitative reasoning is almost never taught as a course, but in the context of other disciplines, such as Mathematics or Physics. We introduce basic elements of a course in reasoning, such as the definition of a concept and the definition of a strategy and study the response of the students. We apply the definitions to algebraic proofing. We conceptualize algebraic concepts, i.e. we name each concept, define its range of applicability and illustrate each concept with typical examples. We also conceptualize strategies for proofing. We find that a diverse population of female middle school students readily accepts this approach and achieves proofing skills on a level which is comparable to university freshmen.

Citation

Hubler, A., Vlasic, A., Stiegler, E., Bievenue, L. & Raineri, D. (2006). Interactive Middle School Courseware on Abstract Reasoning Skills. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2006--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 389-394). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 22, 2019 from .

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