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You Can’t Think About Thinking Without Thinking About Thinking About Something
Article

, MIT, United States

CITE Journal Volume 5, Number 3, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Although printed in 1970, “Teaching Children Thinking” was conceived in 1968 and bears the signs of the heady atmosphere of that time. Across the society change was in the air, deeply rooted assumptions were being challenged. On a smaller and less active but not less radical scale challenges to taken-for-granted ideas about children, about education and about computers energized my MIT seminars and ongoing discussions with an active group (Solomon, Feuerzeig, Bobrow et al.) at BBN1. We were sure that when computers became as common as pencils (which we knew would happen) education would change as fast and as deeply as the transformations through which we were living in civil rights and social and sexual relations. I still think this will happen even though the time needed is turning out to be a little longer than we imagined and the process more complex. When it does happen it will use the ideas that we worked so hard to develop back then.

Citation

Papert, S. (2005). You Can’t Think About Thinking Without Thinking About Thinking About Something. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 5(3), 366-367. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved February 18, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Blending Pedagogical Examinations and Discourse with Teachers’ Practical Experiences for TPACK Transformation

    Margaret Niess & Henry Gillow-Wiles, Oregon State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 2989–2995

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