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The Use of Blogs in Teaching, Knowledge Management, and Performance Improvement
PROCEEDINGS

, San Diego State University, United States ; , Redpepper Consulting, United States ; , Simon Fraser University, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-57-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The number of web logs ('blogs'), or online personal journals, is on the rise. While this trend may reflect a human propensity for self-indulgent introspection, it may also be propelled by the many advantages of blogs. In addition to providing a portal for journal entries, blogs allow authors to self-publish, record reader commentary, and archive their entries. The increased use of blogs on the Internet has exciting implications for the field of communication, education, and educational technology. People who blog often (bloggers) tend to improve their literacy skills, critical thinking skills, and knowledge construction abilities. Furthermore, the easy-to-use template and the often free service of blogs suit educators' needs for feasible and self-maintained technological tools. However, little research has been conducted on the use of blogs for education, knowledge management, and performance improvement, thus pointing to a need for further exploratory study.

Citation

Wang, M., Fix, R. & Bock, L. (2005). The Use of Blogs in Teaching, Knowledge Management, and Performance Improvement. In G. Richards (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2005--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 3192-3199). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 17, 2019 from .

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