You are here:

Do Information Systems Actually Improve Problem-Solving and Decision-Making Performance? -- An Analysis of 3 Different Approaches to the Design of Information Systems
PROCEEDINGS

, , , McGill University, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-57-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

We present three different approaches to the research and development (R&D) of information systems: problem solving, decision making, and case-based reasoning. In contrast to case-based reasoning, problem solving and decision making are rule-based approaches. Problem solving emphasizes the sequential process of searching for a solution path. Decision making focuses on the nature of the decision outcome. We present the results of a selection of studies on the effects of these systems on the problem-solving and decision-making performance of their users. Finally, we discuss the limitations of each of the three approaches and their implications for future research.

Citation

Nakamura, C., Lajoie, S. & Berdugo, G. (2005). Do Information Systems Actually Improve Problem-Solving and Decision-Making Performance? -- An Analysis of 3 Different Approaches to the Design of Information Systems. In G. Richards (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2005--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2251-2257). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 25, 2019 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.