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How do female students perform in online debates and discussion?
PROCEEDINGS

, , , University of South Alabama, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-57-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This study focused on online debates and discussion in a course in which only female students were enrolled to examine whether females would engage in online debate, and if so, would their messages to each other contain traditional elements of debate (i.e., argue, elaborate, critique). The study also investigated whether these elements would be found when students shifted from debates to a discussion-type forum. Content analyses for two debates and one discussion were performed. Results indicate that women argued, provided evidence, elaborated on others' ideas and, surprisingly, critiqued others' comments. They continued to use these elements in their later discussion. The participants also acknowledged and supported others in both the debates and discussion. This may indicate that females use a different style of debate in addition to the traditional one. Only frequencies of overarching and embedded codes are shown in this proposal. Specific examples of the debates and discussion will be shared at the presentation.

Citation

Davidson-Shivers, G., Ellis, H. & Amarasing, K. (2005). How do female students perform in online debates and discussion?. In G. Richards (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2005--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1972-1977). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2019 from .

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