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Association between completing secondary education and adulthood outcomes in Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda
ARTICLE

, College of Education, Michigan State University, United States ; , Northern Illinois University, United States ; , , College of Education, Michigan State University, United States

International Journal of Educational Development Volume 68, Number 1, ISSN 0738-0593 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

In this paper we examine descriptively the relationships between completed secondary education and social, informational, and economic adulthood outcomes of 15–24 year old males and females in Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda. We find that completing secondary education is associated with higher media access and somewhat better health related knowledge. However we also find that completing secondary education is not necessarily associated with a greater sense of agency within the family, disapproval of domestic violence against women and preference for female children. Importantly we find that those with completed secondary education are not necessarily more likely to be employed than those without. Against the backdrop where secondary education completion is increasingly recognized and promoted as an important educational benchmark for youth, our analysis raises questions both about the “promise” and the “relevance” of secondary education as it is currently delivered in many low-income countries.

Citation

Chudgar, A., Kim, Y., Morley, A. & Sakamoto, J. (2019). Association between completing secondary education and adulthood outcomes in Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda. International Journal of Educational Development, 68(1), 35-44. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved June 24, 2019 from .

This record was imported from International Journal of Educational Development on June 3, 2019. International Journal of Educational Development is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2019.04.008

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