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Constructing interpretive inferences about literary text: The role of domain-specific knowledge
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Learning and Instruction Volume 60, Number 1, ISSN 0959-4752 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Student readers struggle to construct the interpretive inferences necessary for successful literary comprehension. Expert think-alouds were conducted to identify the kinds of domain-specific knowledge that were drawn upon when reading the short story "The Elephant". These data were used to construct three reading instructions provided to student (novice) literary readers. These instructions informed the student about two types of literary conventions (Rules of Notice, Rules of Signification, Combined). Analysis of the students’ essays indicated having both types of domain-specific knowledge yielded the most interpretive inferences. Attention to language mediated the effect suggesting a means for domain-specific knowledge to be used to leverage student engagement in literary interpretation.

Citation

McCarthy, K.S. & Goldman, S.R. (2019). Constructing interpretive inferences about literary text: The role of domain-specific knowledge. Learning and Instruction, 60(1), 245-251. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved January 20, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Learning and Instruction on March 15, 2019. Learning and Instruction is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2017.12.004

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