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Pomp and circumstance: University presidents and the role of human capital in determining who leads U.S. research institutions
ARTICLE

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Economics of Education Review Volume 32, Number 1, ISSN 0272-7757 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

While there is wide agreement that leaders matter, little is known regarding the role that human capital plays in determining who becomes one. We exploit unique attributes of the higher education industry to examine if training and academic ability affect the placement of university presidents within the research hierarchy of U.S. institutions. The analysis uses two data sets drawn from the American College President Survey conducted over three decades and a digitized sample of 212 curriculum vitae for presidents at top U.S. universities in 2009, to model the factors that determine who among the pool of university presidents places at Carnegie-classified research institutions. The findings suggest the rise to the presidency of a research institution depends on the investments in research-specific human capital over the entire course of a career consistent with prior evidence that the knowledge of the research enterprise is critical to the success of such institutions.

Citation

Singell, L.D. & Tang, H.H. (2013). Pomp and circumstance: University presidents and the role of human capital in determining who leads U.S. research institutions. Economics of Education Review, 32(1), 219-233. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved April 14, 2021 from .

This record was imported from Economics of Education Review on March 1, 2019. Economics of Education Review is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2012.10.005

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